Resources

Toolkit: The Victims of Crime Act and the Need for Advocacy

Toolkit: The Victims of Crime Act and the Need for Advocacy

In fiscal year 2015 the U.S. Congress approved a federal cap of $2.3 billion for victim services under the federal Victims of Crime Act (VOCA). The Victims of Crime Act and the Need for Advocacy toolkit, prepared by Californians for Safety and Justice, offers an overview of VOCA and provides advocacy tools to bring funding to under-resourced providers and communities.

Toolkit: Apply for VOCA Funding: A Toolkit for Organizations Working With Crime Survivors in Communities of Color and Other Underserved Communities.

Toolkit: Apply for VOCA Funding: A Toolkit for Organizations Working With Crime Survivors in Communities of Color and Other Underserved Communities.

This toolkit from Equal Justice USA will give you the information you need to understand VOCA funding, eligibility, and whether your organization is ready to apply for and sustain a VOCA grant.

Tool: The Prison Population Forecaster

Tool: The Prison Population Forecaster

The Prison Population Forecaster can estimate the effect, by state, of policies that aim to reduce prison admissions and length of stay for the most common types of offenses.

Article: Black Wounds Matter

Article: Black Wounds Matter

By Sarah Stillman, New Yorker, October 15, 2015

Report: 10,000 Fewer Michigan Prisoners: Strategies to reach the goal

Report: 10,000 Fewer Michigan Prisoners: Strategies to reach the goal

10,000 Fewer Michigan Prisoners: Strategies to reach the goal, released by Citizens Alliance on Prisons and Public Spending, examines the key factors that led to an increase in Michigan’s prison population and recommends a list of policy changes grounded in data and research.

Report: Illinois State Commission on Criminal Justice and Sentencing Reform Final Report: Part I

Report: Illinois State Commission on Criminal Justice and Sentencing Reform Final Report: Part I

The Illinois State Commission on Criminal Justice and Sentencing Reform was established to review the State’s current criminal justice and sentencing structure, and the use of alternatives to incarceration, and make recommendations for amendments to state law that will reduce the State’s current prison population by 25% by 2025. This report by the commission presents a set of fourteen foundational recommendations needed in order for the State to reach its goal.

Brief: Breaking the Cycle of Low Level Crime

Brief: Breaking the Cycle of Low Level Crime

Breaking the Cycle of Low Level Crime, a brief by Californians for Safety & Justice, highlights some key local innovations that, if adapted to scale, could replace old ways of doing business with improved public safety, reduced cycles of crime and increased cost-savings.

White Paper: Framework for a Data-Driven Crime Prevention Prosecutor’s Office

White Paper: Framework for a Data-Driven Crime Prevention Prosecutor’s Office

The National Network for Safe Communities, a project of John Jay College of Criminal Justice, lays out a vision for a prosecutor’s office that acts strategically to reduce crime, enhances the legitimacy of the criminal justice system, strengthens the capacity of communities to prevent and reduce crime, and reduces the unintended consequences of existing criminal […]

Brief: Latino Voices: The Impact of Crime and Criminal Justice Policies on Latinos

Brief: Latino Voices: The Impact of Crime and Criminal Justice Policies on Latinos

Latino Voices: The Impact of Crime and Criminal Justice Policies on Latinos, authored by Californians for Safety and Justice, reveals that most public safety policies don’t align with many California Latino needs and values – and highlights growing calls for change.

Report: California Crime Victims’ Voices: Findings from the First-Ever Survey of California Crime Victims and Survivors

Report: California Crime Victims’ Voices: Findings from the First-Ever Survey of California Crime Victims and Survivors

This report summarizes the results from an April 2013 survey on who California’s crime victims are, what they need to recover from crime, and their opinions about state justice priorities. Among the findings, it may be surprising to some that California victims – even when profoundly impacted by their experience with crime – overwhelmingly favor a system that focuses on rehabilitation rather than incarceration.